Screenplays − Professional Copywriting, Copyediting, Proofreading and French Translation Services in Toronto

416-800-9257 • toll free: 1-855-800-9257info@reword.ca
There’s a red carpet
with your name on it.

And there are three rows of paparazzi waiting to get a shot of you, this year’s winner of best original screenplay.

Most screenwriters don’t get the spotlight the way the actors do.

But your script was just that good.

Too bad it didn’t get made because your typos turned off the studio reader.

And now, instead of your movie in the theatres, Vin Diesel has another chance to be a leading man. Ugh.

There’s a red carpet
with your name on it.

And there are three rows of paparazzi waiting to get a shot of you, this year’s winner of best original screenplay.

Most screenwriters don’t get the spotlight the way the actors do.

But your script was just that good.

Too bad it didn’t get made because your typos turned off the studio reader.

And now, instead of your movie in the theatres, Vin Diesel has another chance to be a leading man. Ugh.

Our approach to screenplays

A screenplay’s words are meant to be heard. That’s why we always edit them aloud. If you get a chance to come down to the office and watch us edit a screenplay, it’s worth the trip. We get into character. We commit to the roles. Sometimes we even do the accents. Dan does a pretty good Scottish, an excellent sub-continent and a perfect Jewish grandmother.

Copyediting and proofreading for screenplays

Like with other documents, we read to make sure we catch everything, from typos to errors to inconsistencies to outrageous scenarios that really don’t belong.

Does it make sense? Is there a clear story arc to the movie and to the characters? Is the twist at the end simple enough to get or will it just leave the audience confused?

Script readers are sticklers for strict adherence to the style of a screenplay. One reader told us they do that to “weed out the writers who aren’t committed enough to get it right.”

Interesting, but understandable given how many they get.

French translation for screenplays

The French can’t stand subtitles. It’s cultural: they want to hear their language spoken. We respect that. So we do what we can to respect it. When we translate a screenplay into French, we do it aloud as well. Because again, it’s about being heard the right way.